“This situation requires a really stupid and futile gesture be done on somebody’s part”

And we’re just the guys to do it. (click the links on this post for fun)

Sometimes in training you need to do a really stupid training day just to prove you can. Not because it is particularly useful or beneficial. Not because you want to put a montage of it on the internet (which I guess technically I’m doing right now). Sometimes you need to do some stupid hard training just because you can. Just to prove you are still here and not going quietly in to the night.

This week I am back in STL training at St. Mary’s for most days of the week with the Vulcan brothers. We chatted about a dumb training session I had done years earlier with a great friend that I’ll write about at some point later on (WWSCD). We talked about doing some incredibly painful training and sometimes you can just throw reason outside the window and just do some crazy hard stuff.

Things moved organically and one of the Vulcan brothers was jumping town to go visit their significant other in Chicago on New Year ’s Eve and would miss training for a few days. I had to deadlift on Wednesday which was the last day he would be in town. So we talked about what would be fun and crazy, and we came up with the idea of doing 405 for 100 total reps each. This sounded equal parts stupid and tough so why not we decided.

Wednesday – Dec 30th

The morning came and the elder Vulcan brother was in the gym and ready to go while we waited on the younger and his girlfriend to arrive. We took our time warming up and stretching out before the weight got heavy. The younger brother made it eventually and we of course gave him trouble (but I’m awful about being late to training myself). So then we started deadlifting and worked up to 405 once the weight was loaded we double clipped it (to avoid the plate shifting that can occur from not exactly setting the weight down easily).

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The bar (and/or nemesis) we pulled on. Double clipped for your lifting pleasure
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The board for keeping track of our numbers with a solid quote and random graphs to make it look like we know anything about training.

The two Vulcan brothers pulled conventional from the floor and I did my one inch deficit sumo work. Set one for me was 5 reps and so it was for the rest of them. From there we parted doing however many reps felt not too brutally hard (don’t want to gas out on an early set and fail the rest). With the blaring of Pandora’s Hearts on Fire radio station it carried us through. We marked each rep on the grease board to keep the running tally easy to follow.

I switched grips throughout the sets and the brothers opted for belts midway through, this helped make it a bit manageable. Using enough chalk that made it look like you had a drug dependency is probably the only reason I have skin on my hands right now to type this. Thugh both of my thumbs feel longer and nerves deader from using a hook grip for a number of reps. We all started to super set this with lay around on the ground hoping for the sweet release of death and copious amounts of excrement talking.

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Superset!
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Riding the struggle bus and his belt was on loan from his girlfriend.

Once you made it past 50 reps you started to get a little comfortably numb and the pump in my lower body and lats was solid. Thanks to listening to every montage song from the historical documentaries (Rocky films). We managed to finish. I got done first and just did a few glute ham raises and gravity boot abs to decompress the low back. The elder finished second and the younger finished third. It was the simple (and stupid) brutality we all were looking for.

Wrapping up

If you add up the volume lifted with the percentage of the max it is beyond stupid from a programming standpoint, but sometimes you have to do something to prove you are still here. That aren’t soft. That you still can lay it down when the time comes.

And that’s what’s important.

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